How to Plan a Productive Weekend

Most people do everything to avoid working weekends. Rightly so. Research from Stanford University discovered that people who work more than 55 hours a week get no significant boost from their efforts, regardless of whether they work 56 hours or 80. Other research suggests that occasional overtime isn’t bad, but when longer hours become regular, productivity slides backward.

Sometimes, though, a working weekend can’t be helped. When that happens, follow these tips to ensure you get the most from your extra effort.

Schedule your working hours.

If you go into the weekend with a vague promise to “get some work done,” you likely won’t achieve the results you want. Rather than wait for the moment you feel like working – which, on a weekend, might never come – set a schedule and stick to it.

When to work depends on your personal preferences. I like early mornings because research shows that we tend to be more productive before lunch. Not everyone is a morning person, though. As long as you schedule your work beforehand and follow through on your commitment, you’re on the right track.

Get the right amount of sleep.

If you want to have a productive Saturday, don’t stay up too late on Friday night. When Saturday rolls around, wake up on time and stick to the schedule you set for yourself.

According to research, adults need seven to nine hours of sleep per night. Most healthy people fall somewhere on that spectrum. Only you know what your body needs, though: If you feel sluggish after nine hours, set an earlier alarm. If seven hours feels wrong, give yourself some extra time. Try to keep a consistent schedule (both during the week and on the weekends) to ensure you get the proper amount of rest.

Define your goals beforehand.

When work piles up, you might be tempted to try to finish everything in one go. However, if you don’t set clear expectations for yourself, you could get distracted by other projects or frustrated by your lack of progress.

As you plan your weekend, decide ahead of time which projects to prioritise, then tackle them one at a time.

Take a break from technology.

Most weekend work in 2018 involves a computer. Rather than spend seven days a week in front of a screen, pick a day (or part of one) to unplug from technology.

Stretch your technology break as long as possible. The average smartphone user checks his or her device about once every 6.5 minutes. The more time you spend away from technology, the more refreshed you will be when it’s time to get back to work.

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